logo

coming soon

Days
Hours
Min
Sec

MATTIA CUTTINI

  • Italy

Since 1979 observer of the world with curiosity. After more that 10 years in the electronics field reinvented himself as designer. Musician since forever, explorer of visual and performance arts, researcher.

DEALERS:

knownorigin.io

opensea.io

pixura.io

superrare.co


 

GALLERY
News
Art

NIFTIES Interviews Mattia Cuttini

Hi Mattia, it’s great to have a chat with one of the first and most active members of the crypto community. You are always ready to introduce and help out beginners in the space, would you like to start by sharing with us how you got into the crypto art scene yourself?

At the end of 2018, hex6c pushed me a lot: basically every now and then he would tell me "tokenize this, tokenize that." I had a small amount of cryptocurrencies and I've used them to tokenize my first pieces on KnownOrigin, and after some days on SuperRare. These are my main platforms right now, they both have done a lot for me so I'm faithful to them. And just because people helped me a ton, I do the same with others, that's simple. Oh, and I've done a collaborative piece on Async.art, right, that too was great.


You also witnessed the evolution of both galleries and community, with the rise of collaborations, bid wars, and VR shows, just to name a few things. How was your experience of that? What do you foresee in the future?

Yeah, you're right. It’s really good to evolve, even with ups and downs. Now I feel that we are still evolving, things are changing at the speed of light. What I can say is that experimentation and new features, like Async.art’s idea of programmable art, for example, will be the real game-changers.


Is there any figure or project in the crypto scene – or beyond – that particularly inspires you right now?

As I said, innovation is important but we also need some kind of "limits." Pixelchain.art, a pixel art tokenization platform of tiny 32x32-pixels canvases, is a good example of this "creative limitation" currently inspiring me. Limits make people do the best they can with a small set of possibilities, and with amazing results. I know that it seems impossible sometimes to have innovation with limitations, but there are a lot of good projects and examples. This reminds me of the simplicity of LEGO bricks and, considering my music background, the OP-1, an innovative synthesizer somewhat limited but also versatile, something you can use in infinite ways.
mattia-cuttini

Your artistic production is usually an interplay between the material and virtual realms, between analog and digital technology. During the lockdown you produced a beautiful paper catalog of some of your generative artwork, can you tell us more about the whole project?

As I've also written in my last digital output, Generated #30 Second Iteration - Animated on SuperRare, these works are the result of the Covid-19 lockdown. Once again, what is interesting about them is how the limitation of possibilities created such a result. I'm working on the second booklet now, that will be in full color, printed somewhere else than home - but I'll try to put some artisanal effort into it too. I think there will be a third booklet, to conclude the series with the last iterations. And maybe something to keep them all together, or some reprints.
Oh, I'm also in the process of printing some of these artworks as silkscreens - you know, this speed-of-light-change thing is true for my production too.


You proved to engage in endless experimentation while creating. Any hints on the future developments of your art practice?

Physical and digital means will clash more and more. I want to create some artworks with NFC tags - with Near Field Communication, the tech behind contactless cards. I'm also designing a physical "glitch machine" that might become an actual installation. Oh, and I've also to restart the "SpoXify Dreams" project - I've 2 pieces on KnownOrigin about this that was temporarily halted by the lockdown. So, stay tuned.
And thank you for the interview, Chiara!


Interview by art editor and curator Chiara Braidotti
Cover photo: image curtesy Irene Beltrame

Art

CR(Y)PTALY: A CURATORIAL VIEW ON ITALIAN CRYPTO ART AND BEYOND

In the occasion of ETH Turin, MoCDA curator Eleonora Brizi and artist duo Hackatao set up CR(Y)PTALY, the first Cryptovoxels exhibition of Italian crypto artists. Our art editor Chiara Braidotti had a sneak peek at their work…

 

Eleonora, coming from the contemporary art scene, how was it to approach curation in VR? What advantages and downsides does Cryptovoxels have in comparison to traditional art venues?

Honestly, my approach to curation was the same as for the contemporary art scene. I always want to treat art the same way, regardless of whether it has a digital or physical form.

The opening night is maybe the most important moment for an art show, the time when the space really comes to life. A downside of Cryptovoxels is the lack of energy during the opening. While in a real space you would meet, laugh and exchange ideas, in VR you can’t. I got ready for real, though! I showered, dressed up, put make-up on, even if no one could see me, of course (well actually yes, on the videoconference for ETH Turin).

As an advantage, Cryptovoxels allows you to invite half the world through a link, and people can actually participate, I loved it! You can send as many invitations as you like for an event in the real world, but it’s unthinkable that everyone will show up. That is possible online: virtual spaces can really cancel space-time barriers.

The exhibited artists were chosen through an open call and you mentioned how interesting it was to find out about their artistic identity. Can you describe each one of them with one word?

Sure, here we go!

Arctic: youth, Cicatriciebaci: woman, Alessia Cottons: costume, Mattia Cuttini: mad scientist, Donnoh: hypnosis, Fabiello: path, Hackatao: completeness, hex6c: knowledge, KaySha: spumante, Prometheus: riot, Serste: humanity, Fabiano Sperzari: universe, Undeadlu: vaporwave, Van Gango: doodle, Cristiana Vettor: nature, White Dada: esperanto

 

Did the space influence the artwork selection or was it the other way around? For instance, I am thinking about the room devoted to KaySha's works. 

As for a real venue, there is a continuous dialogue between art and space. I selected the artworks looking at content and the number of pieces to be shown based on the amount of production in the author’s artistic career. In the meantime, Hackatao built the gallery and placed in it the works I had chosen.

Sometimes we decided to change a selected work because it didn’t fit in the room where it was placed. One of hex6c’s reverse-engineered pieces, Schotter – Take II, wasn’t shown as its colors simply didn’t work with the rest of the space.

For KaySha's production, the room came first, and the work was chosen for it. Hackatao wanted a space in which people would feel trapped, and the sisters’ duo were the only ones who could create panic!

Anyway, every time you exhibit art, whether in virtual or physical space, the work and its surroundings have an interrelation. That was also true when I worked in Ai Weiwei’s studio, he would always look at the space first, either to fill it with the most fitting pieces or to possibly produce a new piece inspired by it. In CR(Y)PTALY too there was a site-specific work: the 3D figure designed for the hall by KaySha, sculpted directly in VR.

 

Do you have a favorite piece or room in the gallery?

Yes, there’s a place where I would go even before the opening, just to spend time with the works in it. It really comforts me. I’m talking about Undeadlu’s Cyber Prayer and the room where it’s displayed. The work to me shows a forgiving mother, between human and machine, in the act of praying. Together with two other pieces by the same artist, again showing feminine figures, it creates a sense of shared nostalgia and yet resilience, powerfully speaking about current times.

At the ETH Turin conference, you said there are no common factors in the themes and topics of Italian crypto artworks, but you noticed they share a stronger “physical presence.” Can you expand on that?

Sure! First of all, I was happy not to find stereotypes or precise replicas among the works of Italian crypto artists, they all explored different topics and approaches!

What I mean by “physical presence” is that many artists come from physical art: some are transitioning, some explore generative possibilities, some combine the two languages, seeking a balance between digital and material art.

To me, Hackatao’s work is just art. Coming from matter, consistent in style, rich in themes and references, you cannot draw a line between digital means and physical materials in it: it’s the perfect intersection of the two. An artist as Mattia Cuttini instead continuously changes mediums and methods. Still, paper is where he comes from and where he often goes back to - just consider the crypto art catalog he recently printed.

Materials are crucial to White Dada, who before compressing words on digital canvasses prints them in enamel on real ones, and Van Gango, a trained painter. Arctic too told me she has always been drawing in her life, but after realizing that there were too many rules encoded in drawings, she turned to generative art, where code is openly part of the creative process. And finally, someone like Fabiello found anything he’s ever looked for in crypto art, where he could combine his two big passions: drawing and technology. Maybe, the most natively digital of all are KaySha, with their young age and their VR sculpture.

 

What is your opinion on the role of curation in the context of crypto art and VR? Did this experience change your views?

Curation is great in many contexts, I find it necessary and beautiful. I curated an auction of digital art on the blockchain and more recently spoke at the Async auction of Cypher::Prophet, so I had the chance to talk about the pieces and the stories behind them in the digital scene. People are happy to get insights, they thank you for explaining things. We all need to hear what a work has to say at first glance, art has to speak directly first, but then you need to learn and understand more about it. People must tell stories about art and artists!

Also, for artists themselves curation can be great. They need to hear someone else’s words on their pieces. In CR(Y)PTALY some artists were new to curation and really appreciated it.

  

 

Any other projects you are involved in or looking forward to?

Yes! I want to keep curating digital and crypto art, to create a bridge between “nerdland,” the virtual space, and contemporary art in the established world. We need an old, more widely understood language with super new content in art right now, to reach everyone.

I’m trying to do this that with Breezy Art, my gallery. I want it to be online and distributed, with a physical presence, a wall that people can see in real venues too, as I already have in the New York design showroom “Italian Green Design.” Traditional galleries are over: they are fully alive only at the opening night, it’s unsustainable to have them truly full just a few days a year. But of course, digital art needs a physical component to attract traditional collectors, so a native digital piece could be enhanced by a Meural canvas, an opaque screen framed in wood, and coming with a museum look.

As for future projects, I’m setting up a physical exhibition with digital content in Rome, showing crypto artists together with established ones, like Ai Weiwei. It was supposed to open on May 16th, in the amazing location of San Salvatore in Lauro, a beautiful church with cloister and garden, already hosting a museum. This is the perfect setting, a sacred space that Italian people can understand, that helps them to tune in to an aesthetic that’s new to them - if it will happen in Berlin, we could set it up in a bunker instead. Because of the global emergency, it’s currently postponed to September, with the new title of “Renaissance 2020.” The artists are working to provide an answer, a vaccine for souls, to prompt a new renaissance.

Stay tuned!